Sunday, September 21, 2014 Saturday, September 20, 2014 Friday, September 19, 2014

simonjadis:

I love that they chose one alien asking about immaculate conception

as a great opportunity to remind us that the other alien in the room

is a huge star wars nerd

Thursday, September 18, 2014

fitzefitcher:

daggerpen:

monicalewinsky1996:

Trigger warning: Breakfast

Holy shit.

reasons why we don’t make fun of seemingly odd triggers

nikolaecuza:

danosaurs-and-philions:

im a bad person who thinks bad thoughts like ‘ew what is that girl wearing’ and then remember that im supposed to be positive about all things and then think ‘no she can wear what she wants, fuck what other people say damn girl u look fabulous’ and im just a teeny bit hypocritical tbh

I was always taught by my mother, That the first thought that goes through your mind is what you have been conditioned to think. What you think next defines who you are.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

morivan:

My dream for the 2016 presidential election is not having to choose which human rights I’m feeling like compromising on.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
littleredqueen:

dynastylnoire:

brownglucose:

negritaaa:

niggaimdeadass:

lifeworkfun:

Meet The First Woman To Make It Into The FDNY’s Calendar Of Heroes. Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department. This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men.  There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

YYYYYYYAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!

I am actually crying right now beCAUSE IT’S THE FUCKING YEAR OF THE BLACK GIRL AND I’VE BEEN WAITING SO LONG FOR THIS

This is wonderful!!!

I will never get tired of reblogging this. Iconic

she’s so pretty too holy shit, got dem looks AND muscles!

littleredqueen:

dynastylnoire:

brownglucose:

negritaaa:

niggaimdeadass:

lifeworkfun:

Meet The First Woman To Make It Into The FDNY’s Calendar Of Heroes.

Danae Mines became one of the few female firefighters in the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) 11 years ago, despite her family telling her that only men joined the department.

This year, she broke down another barrier by becoming the first woman to be featured in the FDNY’s 2015 Calendar of Heroes. She had been told that the honor was reserved for men, but when she saw the open call for firefighters, she went, despite feeling a little intimidated standing in line with more than 100 men.

There are currently only 41 women in the department, but perhaps the attention Danae is getting will increase that number. “I wanted my picture in the calendar so that young girls and young women can see me and know that they can do this job,” she told the New York Daily News.

YYYYYYYAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!

I am actually crying right now beCAUSE IT’S THE FUCKING YEAR OF THE BLACK GIRL AND I’VE BEEN WAITING SO LONG FOR THIS

This is wonderful!!!

I will never get tired of reblogging this. Iconic

she’s so pretty too holy shit, got dem looks AND muscles!

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

pumpkinonline:

Sooo we met our goal yesterday!However it’s still not over till it’s over. We’re really excited but, this was the easy part. Now the hard part is afterwards.  Thank you everyone so much for getting us this far. Once it’s all over I can thank everyone properly. Last 52 hours incase you still haven’t donated yet.Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about usPLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.

Yay!

pumpkinonline:

Sooo we met our goal yesterday!
However it’s still not over till it’s over. We’re really excited but, this was the easy part. Now the hard part is afterwards.  
Thank you everyone so much for getting us this far.
Once it’s all over I can thank everyone properly. 

Last 52 hours incase you still haven’t donated yet.

image

Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about us
PLEASE SUPPORT OUR KICKSTARTER! IT ENDS SEPTEMBER 18th.

Yay!